diannejacob

Dec 232014
 

Writing-for-PublicationI’m always telling people to write for pay, and to ask to be paid well. But some food writers write for self expression, or to get clips, and money is not the most important thing.

If so, these publications might be right for you. They pay anywhere from nothing to not much, but offer the satisfaction of publication:

  1. The Bitter Southerner. This gorgeous start-up online magazine only recently came up with money to pay its writers, and maybe not all of them. Here are submissions guidelines.
  2. Graze magazine, based in Chicago, is a semi-annual literary magazine. Here are submission guidelines. As told to the Review Review: “We’re interested in Continue reading »
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Dec 162014
 
A gift is considered to have cash value.

When a food blogger gets free stuff, it is payment in kind, which is considered compensation.

You know those disclaimers at the end of blog posts, when food bloggers write about a product or service and say whether they were compensated?

I’ve noticed some confusion (or should we call it denial?) about what constitutes payment.

There are two kinds of payment: cash payment and “paid in kind,” which means a company gives you goods or services for free. That could be Continue reading »

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Dec 092014
 
Julie-Van-Rosendaal

Working for free at any stage of your career has value, says food writer Julie Van Rosendaal.

A guest post by Julie Van Rosendaal

I’m not being paid to write this. It’s a guest post, a format whose popularity has slipped in recent years as the concept of writing for exposure began to lose its luster. It seemed more popular back when no one was making any money at this blogging thing.

So why am I writing it, if I’m not being paid? Because I like and admire Dianne, I read her blog and want to give back for all the knowledge she’s shared with me, and because I’m part of this online community and find it an interesting conversation. Because I do what I do for plenty of reasons, and only one of them is monetary.

Derek Thompson made a good point in The Atlantic, that most of us Continue reading »

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Dec 022014
 
Dianne-Jacob-Pizza

Fitting dough to a pizza screen for one of around 80 pizzas I made for  a pizza cookbook — including one with a questionable ingredient. (Photo by Kris Montgomery)

Based on all the great feedback and discussion on last week’s post about recipe copy-editing, I’m asking about writing recipes with non-standard ingredient sizes.

Case in point: How big is a lamb sausage?

One of the USA of Pizza’s recipes called for “1 lamb sausage link” (not merguez). I purchased the link at a butcher. It weighed 5 1/2 ounces.

The copy editor asked if it should be 6 ounces.

Okay, I thought. Maybe 6 ounces is a standard size. But I didn’t know for sure, so I researched it. I Googled “lamb sausage” and clicked on images. I found Continue reading »

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Nov 252014
 
Smoked-salmon-pizza

This smoked salmon pizza in The United States of Pizza  includes sliced red onion. This was a source of contention!

If a copy editor has ever touched your cookbook manuscript, you will relate.

And if you haven’t had the experience yet, you will be intrigued — and possibly worried.

Before I start this discussion, however, I want to be clear. I’m grateful for all the goofs our very capable copy editor caught in chef Craig Priebe’s and my new pizza book (The USA of Pizza, October, 2015) manuscript.

But man, some of the queries made us scratch our heads. Here are three  Continue reading »

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Nov 192014
 
LIndsay-and-Bjork-Olstrom

Pinch of Yum’s LIndsay and Bjork Ostrom report earnings each month of up to $30,000+.

Like thousands of other young women, Lindsay Olstrom started a food blog in 2010 called Pinch of Yum. She was in charge of the content and photography. Her husband Bjork, a techie, took charge of the tech issues and business.

Here’s what’s different: Four years later, the site receives more than 2 million page views per month. The couple has created a lucrative business that sometimes grosses more than $30,000 per month.

As the blog grew, the couple got questions on everything from food photography to starting a blog, so they started Food Blogger Pro, for food bloggers who want to  Continue reading »

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Nov 112014
 
Tomato sauces @540

Vibrant tomato sauces, captured courtesy of photographer Donna Ruhlman.

Who has time to keep up with all the tips and irresistible stories on the Internet?

Now you do! I’ve saved you hours by aggregating this tomato-sauce colored list of links about food and recipe writing, successful bloggers, book promotion, and freelance Continue reading »

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